The Valslide Skate Position Circle and 2-Way Skater are two exercises we’ll integrate into our prep work or pair with main exercises to help reinforce low position stability of the stance leg.

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Kevin Neeld, PhD (@kevinneeld)

In both variations, we’re looking to keep the hip, knee and toes in a straight line throughout the movement.

In the Valslide Skate Position Circle, the emphasis is on locking out the long leg, and keeping the hips stable as the leg “sweeps” around to the back position and then back through to the start.

In the 2-Way Skater, the goal is to reach as far laterally and as far under, finishing through the toes in both, while keeping the hips facing forward.

Typically performed for 2-3 sets of 6 reps each.

Feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. If you’re interested in year-round comprehensive hockey-specific training programs for players at different ages, check out Ultimate Hockey Transformation.

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!

 

Bear crawl variations provide a great opportunity to integrate core strength with shoulder stability work.

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Kevin Neeld, PhD (@kevinneeld)

A few coaching cues on this exercise:

✅ Slightly tuck the tail bone under
✅ Stay long through the spine as you push your chest away from the ground
✅ Keep your hips square as you pick one hand up to touch your opposite shoulder.

Typically performed for 3 sets of 6-8 reps/side.

Feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For more information on in- and off-season program design, training and reconditioning for injured players, and integrating sports science into a comprehensive training process, check out Optimizing Adaptation & Performance

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!

 

This is a variation of the 90-Degree MiniBand Step-Out exercise I posted a couple weeks back.

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Kevin Neeld, PhD (@kevinneeld)

Similar to the previous variation, the goal here is to hold strong on the front knee position while the hips open up. The major difference here is that now the shoulders are staying square to the original direction.

This helps reinforce dissociation between the shoulders and hips that helps the player keep their eyes oriented to the play while repositioning in a different direction.

Typically performed for 2-3 sets of 6-8 reps/side.

Feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For comprehensive hockey training programs to improve your speed AND repeat sprint ability, check out: Speed Training for Hockey

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!

 

The Alternating MiniBand Elvis is another exercise we integrate into our prep work.

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Kevin Neeld, PhD (@kevinneeld)

There are a couple things this exercise can help accomplish:

1️⃣ Help athletes learn to dissociate between hip and lumbar range of motion.

Keeping the pelvis stable while moving from the hip can help athletes create more power, while generally reducing unnecessary stress on the low back/lower ab areas.

2️⃣ Improve strength/control of the hip external rotators from an internally rotated position.

Many exercises designed to strengthen the hip rotators start with the hip in a neutral position of rotation and work into external rotation from here, so they miss ~1/2 the arc, which is particularly important since this is where most injuries occur.

A few quick coaching cues:

✅ Keep your hips level and facing forward throughout the exercise. Put your hands on your hips as a reference.
✅ Allow one knee to “fall” in as far as possible, pause, and then pull the knee out as far as possible to stretch the band.
✅ You can allow your feet to roll in and out as you move from the hip, but your foot should stay on the ground throughout.

Typically performed for 2-3 sets of 8-12 reps/side. Can progress by moving to thicker bands.

Give this a shot, and feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, tag a friend in the comments section below, and please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For comprehensive hockey training programs to improve your speed AND repeat sprint ability, check out: Speed Training for Hockey

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!

 

The 90-Degree MiniBand Step-Out is an exercise we’ll integrate into our prep work both in the off-season and during the year.

The goal here is to teach the player to “hold strong” on the front side knee as they open-up in the opposite direction.

It’s fairly common for players to take some form of contact while in these positions, and a failure to keep the knee posted outward can lead to injury. This helps reinforce a stronger base that may reduce injury risk, but will also help athletes maintain space/position while taking contact through a transitional pattern.

Keeping the band around the knees provides the most direct feedback to the player about their knee position (which is largely driven by hip control).

A few quick cues:

✅ Aggressively pull the front knee out to “stretch the band” while stepping back and around 90-degrees

✅ Keep hips centered between both feet at all times

✅ Head and shoulders should stay stacked over the hips throughout the motion

If the athlete is having a hard time grasping the pattern, I’ll set up next to them with my shin parallel to theirs and lightly push my knee into theirs, so they can feel the contact while resisting the pressure during the movement.

Typically performed for 2-3 sets of 6-8 reps/side.

Give this a shot, and feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, tag a friend in the comments section below, and please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For comprehensive hockey training programs to improve your speed AND repeat sprint ability, check out: Speed Training for Hockey

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!