@timlebbossiere shares an important consideration on how to individualize upper body exercise seleciton based on t-spine presentation:

From Tim:

An easy way to individualize your program can be changing upper body exercise selection based on the thoracic spine.

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Kevin Neeld, PhD (@kevinneeld)



GENERALLY you can classify individuals as more kyphotic (curved) in nature vs. more lordodic (flat). Individuals with flatter t-spines can obviously benefit from a strength stand point with bench press variations, but the extension pattern of these types of lifts could be feeding in to upper body movement restrictions that are already present.

Switching these individuals to upper body pressing variations where the scaps are free to move, allowing the serratus to protract scaps around the rib cage could be extremely beneficial for improving movement potential, leading to better gains down the line with the ability to recruit the correct musculature through a bigger range of motion.

Feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For more information on in- and off-season program design, training and reconditioning for injured players, and integrating sports science into a comprehensive training process, check out Optimizing Adaptation & Performance

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Great post on taking a broader view on ankle mobility from @timlebbossiere.

Give these a shot, and feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

From TIm:

One of the things I’ve strived to get better at over the years is finding meaningful ways to improve ankle mobility because I think it is the hardest joint to get meaningful changes in

I think too often we just tell athletes to throw their toes on the wall and do a couple of reps of ankle dorsiflexion. That’s better than nothing, but we have to remember that the ankle dorsiflexes, plantarflexes, inverts, everts, and rotates.

Some of my favorite “different” ankle mobility variations:

1. Staggered Stance Squat – dorsiflexion on back leg
2. Lateral Lunge to Cross Behind Lunge – inversion/eversion of stable leg
3. Lateral Leg Swings – rotation of stable leg (if you keep your foot pointing straight ahead)
4. Anterior Ankle Stretch – plantarflexion in both ankles

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Kevin Neeld, PhD (@kevinneeld)

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For more information on in- and off-season program design, training and reconditioning for injured players, and integrating sports science into a comprehensive training process, check out Optimizing Adaptation & Performance

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!