One of the many differences between goalies and forwards/defensemen in hockey is that they rely more on short, powerful pushes to move around the crease, whereas skating is characterized by longer pushes.

Traditional jump training has a lot of value in improving lower body power in players at all positions, but when this work is prioritized in isolation goalies often report that they’re “over-pushing” on the ice.

Integrating some work that emphasizes short pushes from a laterally extended position can help goalies learn to maximize speed through a small range to reposition quickly without overshooting their position.

 
 
 
 
 
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The Wide Stance Lateral Push w/ Med Ball is one example of an exercise that helps emphasize these short pushes, using the med ball to reinforce a tall and quiet upper body during the movement.

Typically performed for 3 sets of 5 reps per side.

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To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For comprehensive hockey training programs to improve your speed AND repeat sprint ability, check out: Speed Training for Hockey

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Despite this, many athletes succeed without possessing elite speed.

Ultimately, speed serves to help create and close space.

Making fast/accurate decisions with ball/puck movement can also create space. Being in the right position can minimize the need to travel excessive distances, allow players to win races without being faster.

Speed development should be a key goal in all performance training programs, but athletes should be focusing on improving the other areas with equal emphasis.

Feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For comprehensive hockey training programs to improve your speed AND repeat sprint ability, check out: Speed Training for Hockey

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!

 

The Alternating Crossover Run is an exercise I’ll integrate into our pre-practice prep and as a main exercise in speed development blocks.

 
 
 
 
 
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It’s a great option to teach:

1️⃣ Hip/shoulder separation
2️⃣ An aggressive push-under
3️⃣ Introductory single-leg deceleration.

The goal here is to cover a lot of ground laterally, while turning the hips in the movement direction, but keeping the shoulders square to straight ahead. This hip/shoulder separation comes into play in most transitional patterns, but is especially helpful for situations where your eyes need to track the play away from the direction you’re moving.

Great option for athletes that don’t have a lot of space for their speed work.

Typically performed for 3 sets of 3-5 reps per side.

Feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For comprehensive hockey training programs to improve your speed AND repeat sprint ability, check out: Speed Training for Hockey

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!

 

Over the last 10 years, there’s been a wide-spread emphasis on “high intensity interval training” to improve conditioning in team sport athletes.

Recently, there’s been more attention paid to the importance of repeat sprint ability (i.e. clustered maximum efforts with incomplete rest before longer periods of lower intensity activity or complete rest), either as the predominant characteristic of sport or as a key characteristic during critical moments of competition.

Unfortunately, a byproduct of these trends is that the benefits of aerobic training have been either largely overlooked or actively dismissed.

Short sprints rely heavily on the PCr (Phosphocreatine) system as an energy source. One of the major limiting factors to repeat sprint ability is the resynthesis of PCr, which is depleted from max efforts lasting more than few seconds (or short efforts repeated within condensed time periods…like a typical hockey shift).

Aerobic training is one of the primary methods of improving PCr resynthesis rates.

Below is a quote from a paper I reference often:

“High-intensity interval training (6–12·[2 minutes at ~100% VO2max:1minute rest]), can significantly improve PCr resynthesis during the first 60 seconds following high-intensity exercise. In contrast, no changes in the rate of PCr resynthesis have been reported following interval (8·[30 seconds at ~130% VO2max:90seconds rest]), or intermittent-sprint training (15·[6-second sprint: 1-minute jog recovery]), or training involving repeated, 30-second, all-out efforts (4–7·[30 seconds ‘all-out’: 3–4 minutes rest]).“

While the authors use “high-intensity interval training” to describe the 6-12 x 2:00/1:00 interval, this is not a method commonly used by those relying on high intensity conditioning (the later examples in the quote are more representative).

The point here is that even if your goal is SOLELY to support maximum speed efforts, aerobic training plays a KEY role in allowing the athlete to repeat those outputs.

Feel free to post any comments/questions below. If you found this helpful, please share/re-post it so others can benefit.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For comprehensive hockey training programs to improve your speed AND repeat sprint ability, check out: Speed Training for Hockey

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!

 

Hard to believe it’s been 3 years since Speed Training for Hockey was released.

When @fitness_pollenator and I sat down to map out the book, our goal was to put together a comprehensive resource that details all of the factors that can improve a player’s speed, written specifically for youth players, parents, and coaches.

We included a 12-week off-season training program to both illustrate how all the pieces fit together into a cohesive training plan, and to provide readers with a program they can follow to start making immediate improvements. We also included a comprehensive video database of all the exercises referenced in the book, so readers know exactly how each exercise should be performed.

Over the last 3 years, we’ve received great feedback about Speed Training for Hockey from players, parents, coaches, performance specialists, and rehab professionals alike.

✅ If you’re interested in grabbing a copy, you can find the book on Amazon, or check out http://SpeedTrainingforHockey.com (which also has more information about the book).

✅ If you already have a copy, feel free to share your thoughts about the book in the comments section below, or tag a friend that you think would benefit from grabbing a copy.

???? We appreciate all your support over the last 3 years, and look forward to hearing from more players about the results they get from using the Speed Training for Hockey program this off-season!

Feel free to post any comments/questions below.

To your success,

Kevin Neeld
SpeedTrainingforHockey.com
HockeyTransformation.com
OptimizingAdaptation.com

P.S. For comprehensive hockey training programs to improve your speed AND repeat sprint ability, check out: Speed Training for Hockey

Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!