Posts in "Hockey Conditioning"

Physiological Demands of Ice Hockey

Physiological Demands of Ice Hockey

There are many ways to analyze the physiological demands of a sport, but tracking heart rate (HR) is the most commonly used. When looking at the HR response during shifts of male Canadian university players, forwards had higher peak and average HRs compared to defensemen. This is consistent with my experience, and speaks to the… Read more

Analyzing Game Demands of Ice Hockey: Positional Differences

Analyzing Game Demands of Ice Hockey: Positional Differences

Four separate studies looking at different levels of competition across different time periods share common findings. Defensemen log more minutes, but their shifts are characterized by significantly less high intensity work and sprinting compared to forwards. The natural question that arises here is “should defensemen spend more time doing longer aerobic work?” Short answer –… Read more

Analyzing Game Demands of Ice Hockey: Sprinting Emphasis

Analyzing Game Demands of Ice Hockey: Sprinting Emphasis

In a professional hockey game, players perform around 7 high intensity skating efforts per shift, including 1-2 sprints around 20-30m, accumulating over 2000m in high intensity skating throughout a game. These sprinting efforts often have an impact on possession, scoring opportunities, and ultimately the outcome of the game. Ice hockey is a repeat sprint sport, and as… Read more

Analyzing Game Demands of Ice Hockey

Analyzing Game Demands of Ice Hockey

In an international hockey game, the average shift length was ~86s, which was split in half between playing and stoppage time. Players spent ~18% of their playing time in high intensity skating. The big take home here is that the ice hockey requires bursts of high intensity skating interspersed by periods of lower intensity skating… Read more

The Biggest Mistake in Hockey Conditioning

The Biggest Mistake in Hockey Conditioning

There are many ways to break down the demands of the game to gain insight into how to best prepare. In ice hockey, it’s common to look at shift length and work-to-rest ratios as an indicator of game demands. At most levels of hockey, a typical shift is 40-60s and teams carry 3-4 forward lines… Read more