Kevin Neeld — Hockey Training, Sports Performance, & Sports Science
Stretch Shortening Cycle vs. Stretch Reflex

Stretch Shortening Cycle vs. Stretch Reflex

Different mechanisms. Different training implications. To your success, Kevin NeeldSpeedTrainingforHockey.comHockeyTransformation.comOptimizingAdaptation.com P.S. If you’re interested in improving your speed on the ice, check out my book Speed Training for Hockey. Enter your first name and email below to sign up for my FREE Sports Performance and Hockey Training Newsletter!

Understanding the Stretch Reflex in Skating

Understanding the Stretch Reflex in Skating

See below for a quick video outlining the influence of the stretch reflex and stretch shortening cycle in skating. Major Take-Away: The stretch reflex should primarily be trained in positions of deep hip and knee bend, with less focus on the more upright posture, short contact time exercises applicable to top speed sprinting OFF the… Read more

Core Training Exercise for Balance

Core Training Exercise for Balance

While the previous two videos (see: Integrated Core Training for Dynamic Stability and Core Training Variations for Dynamic Stability) help reinforce elements of low-position control important for skating, the Single Leg Stance Med Ball Figure 8 is more of a traditional balance exercise. The goal is to stay tall and centered over the foot. When someone… Read more

Core Training Variations for Dynamic Stability

Core Training Variations for Dynamic Stability

Following up on a previous post, over the next few days, I’ll share other core variations we use to reinforce stability across a variety of different positions. The video below is of a Split Squat Med Ball Figure 8. As with the last video, the goal is to maintain depth and a forward lean/shin angle,… Read more

Integrated Core Training for Dynamic Stability

Integrated Core Training for Dynamic Stability

One of the key skating characteristics of elite hockey players is that they adopt a low skating position. From an off-ice training perspective, hockey players should first demonstrate that they have the mobility and low position strength and endurance to get into and hold these types of positions. Once this has been achieved, it can be helpful… Read more

Kevin Neeld

Kevin Neeld Knows Hockey

Kevin has rapidly established himself as a leader in the field of physical preparation and sports science for ice hockey. He is currently the Head Performance Coach for the Boston Bruins, where he oversees all aspects of designing and implementing the team’s performance training program, as well as monitoring the players’ performance, workload and recovery. Prior to Boston, Kevin spent 2 years as an Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach for the San Jose Sharks after serving as the Director of Performance at Endeavor Sports Performance in Pitman, NJ. He also spent 5 years as a Strength and Conditioning Coach with USA Hockey’s Women’s Olympic Hockey Team, and has been an invited speaker at conferences hosted by the NHL, NSCA, and USA Hockey.